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United States women's national artistic gymnastics team


United States women's national artistic gymnastics team


The United States women's national artistic gymnastics team represents the United States in FIG international competitions.

As of 2023, the U.S. team is the reigning World team champion and the reigning Olympic team silver medalists, with the four gymnasts nicknamed the "Fighting Four".

History

The U.S. women won the team competition bronze medal at the 1948 Summer Olympics. Afterwards, they did not win another Summer Olympics or World Championships medal until the 1984 when the Olympic team won silver. During that competition, Mary Lou Retton also became the first American to win the individual all-around gold medal. The Americans started consistently winning Olympic and World team medals in the early 1990s with future Hall of Famers Shannon Miller and Dominique Dawes. The 1996 Olympic team, known as the Magnificent Seven, was the first American team to win Olympic gold. An iconic moment in the sport's history came late in the competition, when an injured Kerri Strug stuck a vault to secure the title. After 1996, the team regressed for several years as their stars took breaks from competing.

Márta Károlyi headed the program after the 2000 Olympics, ushering in an era of success for the U.S. team as they became one of the most dominant countries in women's gymnastics. The U.S. team has medalled in every Olympics and Worlds since 2000. They won their first World gold medal in 2003. At the 2004 Olympics, they won the team silver, and Carly Patterson became the second American gymnast to win the individual all-around. The U.S. team continued their success in the next quad. They won another Olympic silver medal in 2008. Nastia Liukin and Shawn Johnson were two of the best gymnasts of their era and finished first and second in the 2008 individual all-around.

Since their second-place finish at the 2010 Worlds, the U.S. team has never lost an Olympic or World team competition. They won gold at the 2011 Worlds and then won gold at the 2012 Olympics by over five points. The 2012 team was nicknamed the Fierce Five and included Gabby Douglas, the first woman of color to win the Olympic individual all-around. In 2013, Simone Biles started her senior career and helped the U.S. team dominate the sport through 2016. In addition to the team gold medals, Biles won the individual all-around at the Worlds and Olympics for four straight years. The 2016 Olympic team, featuring Biles and veterans Douglas and Aly Raisman, was named the Final Five. They won the team competition by more than eight points.

Olympic Games

The USA Gymnastics women have won the Olympic Gold three times, in 1996, 2012, and 2016. These successes led to the nicknames Magnificent Seven, Fierce Five, and Final Five, respectively. They won four silvers in 1984, 2004, 2008, and 2020 and three bronzes in 1948, 1992 and 2000. The 2016 team name alluded to Márta Károlyi's final team to coach and that the team structure will be changed to four members beginning with the 2020 Olympic Games. The 1988 Olympic Games was the only year in which the team did not medal since its formation in 1982; they missed the bronze medal by one deduction. Six American women have won the Olympic individual all-around title, including five consecutive titles from 2004–20: Mary Lou Retton (1984), Carly Patterson (2004), Nastia Liukin (2008), Gabby Douglas (2012), Simone Biles (2016), and Sunisa Lee (2020). The most decorated American gymnasts at the Olympics, with seven medals apiece, are Shannon Miller (2 gold, 2 silver, 3 bronze) and Simone Biles (4 gold, 1 silver, 2 bronze).

World Championships

The United States women team is currently third in the all-time medal count for the World Artistic Gymnastics Championships. The first American gymnast to win a medal at the World Championships was Cathy Rigby who won silver on beam in 1970. The first female American gymnast to win a world title was Marcia Frederick in 1978 on the uneven bars. The most decorated American gymnast at the World Championships is Simone Biles, who won 25 medals (19 gold, 3 silver and 3 bronze) from 2013 to 2019. The United States won team gold in 2003, 2007, 2011, 2014, 2015, 2018, and 2019. Additionally, eight American women have won the individual World all-around title: Kim Zmeskal (1991), Shannon Miller (1993-1994), Chellsie Memmel (2005), Shawn Johnson (2007), Bridget Sloan (2009), Jordyn Wieber (2011), Simone Biles (2013-2015, 2018-2019), and Morgan Hurd (2017). Biles is the only American gymnast to win both the Olympic and World all-around titles.

Current roster

As of April 3, 2024:

Senior team

Junior team

Staff

  • Dan Baker – Developmental Lead
  • Chellsie Memmel – Technical Lead
  • Alicia Sacramone-Quinn – Strategic Lead
  • Annie Heffernon – Senior Vice President
  • Krissy Klein – Women's Program Manager
  • Kim Riley – Managing Director of Athlete and Coaching Programs

Team competition results

Olympic Games

  • 1928 — did not participate
  • 1936 — 5th place
    Jennie Caputo, Consetta Caruccio-Lenz, Margaret Duff, Irma Haubold, Marie Kibler, Ada Lunardoni, Adelaide Meyer, Mary Wright
  • 1948 — bronze medal
    Ladislava Bakanic, Marian Barone, Consetta Caruccio-Lenz, Dorothy Dalton, Meta Elste-Neumann, Helen Schifano, Clara Schroth, Anita Simonis
  • 1952 — 15th place
    Marian Barone, Dorothy Dalton, Meta Elste-Neumann, Ruth Grulkowski, Marie Hoesly, Doris Kirkman, Clara Schroth, Ruth Topalian
  • 1956 — 9th place
    Muriel Davis, Doris Fuchs, Judy Howe, Jackie Klein, Joyce Racek, Sandra Ruddick
  • 1960 — 9th place
    Muriel Davis, Doris Fuchs, Betty-Jean Maycock, Teresa Montefusco, Sharon Richardson, Gail Sontgerath
  • 1964 — 9th place
    Kathleen Corrigan, Muriel Davis, Dale McClements, Linda Metheny, Janie Speaks, Marie Walther
  • 1968 — 6th place
    Wendy Cluff, Kathy Gleason, Linda Metheny, Colleen Mulvihill, Cathy Rigby, Joyce Tanac
  • 1972 — 4th place
    Kimberly Chace, Linda Metheny, Joan Moore, Roxanne Pierce, Cathy Rigby, Nancy Thies
  • 1976 — 6th place
    Kolleen Casey, Kimberly Chace, Carrie Englert, Kathy Howard, Debra Willcox, Leslie Wolfsberger
  • 1980 — did not participate
  • 1984 — silver medal
    Pam Bileck, Michelle Dusserre, Kathy Johnson, Julianne McNamara, Mary Lou Retton, Tracee Talavera
  • 1988 — 4th place
    Brandy Johnson, Kelly Garrison, Melissa Marlowe, Phoebe Mills, Hope Spivey, Chelle Stack
  • 1992 — bronze medal
    Wendy Bruce, Dominique Dawes, Shannon Miller, Betty Okino, Kerri Strug, Kim Zmeskal
  • 1996 — gold medal
    Amanda Borden, Amy Chow, Dominique Dawes, Shannon Miller, Dominique Moceanu, Jaycie Phelps, Kerri Strug
  • 2000 — bronze medal
    Amy Chow, Jamie Dantzscher, Dominique Dawes, Kristen Maloney, Elise Ray, Tasha Schwikert
  • 2004 — silver medal
    Mohini Bhardwaj, Annia Hatch, Terin Humphrey, Courtney Kupets, Courtney McCool, Carly Patterson
  • 2008 — silver medal
    Shawn Johnson, Nastia Liukin, Chellsie Memmel, Samantha Peszek, Alicia Sacramone, Bridget Sloan
  • 2012 — gold medal
    Gabby Douglas, McKayla Maroney, Aly Raisman, Kyla Ross, Jordyn Wieber
  • 2016 — gold medal
    Simone Biles, Gabby Douglas, Laurie Hernandez, Madison Kocian, Aly Raisman
  • 2020 — silver medal
    Simone Biles, Jordan Chiles, Sunisa Lee, Grace McCallum

World Championships

Names in italics are alternates who received a team medal.

  • 1934 — did not participate
  • 1938 — did not participate
  • 1950 — did not participate
  • 1954 — did not participate
  • 1958 — did not participate
  • 1962 — 8th place
    Muriel Davis, Doris Fuchs, Betty-Jean Maycock, Gail Sontgerath, Avis Tieber, Marie Walther
  • 1966 — 6th place
    Debbie Bailey, Doris Fuchs, Dale McClements, Kathy Gleason, Carolyn Hacker, Joyce Tanac
  • 1970 — 7th place
    Cleo Carver, Kimberly Chace, Wendy Cluff, Adele Gleaves, Joan Moore, Cathy Rigby
  • 1974 — 6th place
    Janette Anderson, Ann Carr, Diane Dunbar, Debbie Fike, Kathy Howard, Joan Moore
  • 1978 — 5th place
    Christa Canary, Marcia Frederick, Kathy Johnson, Leslie Pyfer, Rhonda Schwandt, Donna Turnbow
  • 1979 — 6th place
    Christa Canary, Marcia Frederick, Kathy Johnson, Suzy Kellems, Leslie Pyfer, Leslie Russo
  • 1981 — 6th place
    Michelle Goodwin, Kathy Johnson, Amy Koopman, Julianne McNamara, Gina Stallone, Tracee Talavera
  • 1983 — 7th place
    Pam Bileck, Kelly Garrison, Kathy Johnson, Julianne McNamara, Yumi Mordre, Tanya Service
  • 1985 — 6th place
    Pam Bileck, Tracey Calore, Kelly Garrison, Sabrina Mar, Marie Roethlisberger, Jennifer Sey
  • 1987 — 6th place
    Rhonda Faehn, Kelly Garrison, Sabrina Mar, Melissa Marlowe, Phoebe Mills, Kristie Phillips
  • 1989 — 4th place
    Wendy Bruce, Christy Henrich, Brandy Johnson, Kim Kelly, Chelle Stack, Sandy Woolsey
  • 1991 — silver medal
    Michelle Campi, Hilary Grivich, Shannon Miller, Betty Okino, Kerri Strug, Kim Zmeskal
  • 1994 — silver medal
    Amanda Borden, Amy Chow, Dominique Dawes, Larissa Fontaine, Shannon Miller, Jaycie Phelps, Kerri Strug
  • 1995 — bronze medal
    Mary Beth Arnold, Theresa Kulikowski, Shannon Miller, Dominique Moceanu, Jaycie Phelps, Kerri Strug, Doni Thompson
  • 1997 — 6th place
    Kendall Beck, Mohini Bhardwaj, Kristen Maloney, Dominique Moceanu, Kristy Powell, Jennie Thompson
  • 1999 — 5th place
    Jeanette Antolin, Vanessa Atler, Jamie Dantzscher, Kristen Maloney, Elise Ray, Morgan White
  • 2001 — bronze medal
    Mohini Bhardwaj, Katie Heenan, Ashley Miles, Tasha Schwikert, Rachel Tidd, Tabitha Yim
  • 2003 — gold medal
    Terin Humphrey, Courtney Kupets, Chellsie Memmel, Carly Patterson, Tasha Schwikert, Hollie Vise
  • 2006 — silver medal
    Jana Bieger, Natasha Kelley, Nastia Liukin, Chellsie Memmel, Ashley Priess, Alicia Sacramone
  • 2007 — gold medal
    Ivana Hong, Shawn Johnson, Nastia Liukin, Samantha Peszek, Alicia Sacramone, Shayla Worley
  • 2010 — silver medal
    Rebecca Bross, Mackenzie Caquatto, Mattie Larson, Aly Raisman, Alicia Sacramone, Bridget Sloan
  • 2011 — gold medal
    Gabby Douglas, McKayla Maroney, Aly Raisman, Alicia Sacramone, Sabrina Vega, Jordyn Wieber
  • 2014 — gold medal
    Alyssa Baumann, Simone Biles, Madison Desch, Madison Kocian, Ashton Locklear, Kyla Ross, MyKayla Skinner
  • 2015 — gold medal
    Simone Biles, Gabby Douglas, Brenna Dowell, Madison Kocian, Maggie Nichols, Aly Raisman, MyKayla Skinner
  • 2018 — gold medal
    Simone Biles, Kara Eaker, Morgan Hurd, Grace McCallum, Riley McCusker, Ragan Smith
  • 2019 — gold medal
    Simone Biles, Jade Carey, Kara Eaker, Sunisa Lee, Grace McCallum, MyKayla Skinner
  • 2022 — gold medal
    Skye Blakely, Jade Carey, Jordan Chiles, Shilese Jones, Leanne Wong, Lexi Zeiss
  • 2023 — gold medal
    Simone Biles, Skye Blakely, Shilese Jones, Joscelyn Roberson, Leanne Wong, Kayla DiCello

Junior World Championships

Names in italics are alternates who received a team medal.

  • 2019 — bronze medal
    Sydney Barros, Skye Blakely, Kayla DiCello, Konnor McClain
  • 2023 – silver medal
    Jayla Hang, Hezly Rivera, Izzy Stassi, Kieryn Finnell

Most decorated gymnasts

This list includes all American female artistic gymnasts who have won at least four medals at the Olympic Games and the World Artistic Gymnastics Championships combined.

Giuseppe Zanotti Luxury Sneakers

Best international results

Hall of Famers

Nine national team gymnasts, one national team coach, and one official have been inducted into the International Gymnastics Hall of Fame:

  • Béla Károlyi (coach) – 1997
  • Mary Lou Retton – 1997
  • Cathy Rigby – 1997
  • Shannon Miller – 2006
  • Dominique Dawes – 2009
  • Kim Zmeskal – 2012
  • Jackie Fie (FIG official) – 2014
  • Alicia Sacramone – 2017
  • Nastia Liukin – 2018
  • Shawn Johnson – 2019
  • Chellsie Memmel – 2022

See also

  • Artistic gymnastics in the United States
  • United States men's national artistic gymnastics team
  • List of former United States women's national gymnastics team rosters
  • List of U.S. National Championships medalists in gymnastics
  • List of Olympic female artistic gymnasts for the United States
  • United States at the World Artistic Gymnastics Championships

References


Text submitted to CC-BY-SA license. Source: United States women's national artistic gymnastics team by Wikipedia (Historical)

Articles connexes


  1. United States men's national artistic gymnastics team
  2. Great Britain women's national artistic gymnastics team
  3. Artistic gymnastics in the United States
  4. USA Gymnastics
  5. Gymnastics at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Women's artistic team all-around
  6. Magnificent Seven (gymnastics)
  7. Final Five (gymnastics)
  8. Jennifer Sey
  9. List of former United States women's national gymnastics team rosters
  10. United States at the World Artistic Gymnastics Championships
  11. Artistic gymnastics
  12. 2016 United States women's national gymnastics team season
  13. Tiana Sumanasekera
  14. European Women's Artistic Gymnastics Championships
  15. World Artistic Gymnastics Championships
  16. USA Gymnastics National Championships
  17. Gymnastics at the 2020 Summer Olympics – Women's artistic individual all-around
  18. Gymnastics at the 2000 Summer Olympics – Women's artistic team all-around
  19. EVO Gymnastics
  20. Aly Raisman